Sidebar

28
Sat, Mar
0 New Articles

Typography

WILLEMSTAD--If St. Maarten feels something not going right with the division of assets and liabilities of the dismantled Netherlands Antilles, it should check with its representative on the settlement committee.

That's what committee chairman Faroe Metry said in response to the statement by Finance Minister Roland Tuitt in Parliament that "Curaçao is plundering" the liquidity remaining from the – no longer existent – Antillean constellation.

Metry said he had no idea what Tuitt was talking about, but St. Maarten has a member [Jean James-Ed.] on the committee. "I don't know if there is any plundering, but the settlement committee is doing its work according to what is determined by law."

According to him, government accountants SOAB and KPMG are still working on the final balance. As an advance, the committee has been paying creditors who reported after the new constitutional ties within the Dutch Kingdom took effect on 10-10-10.

"The law says that the governments of the two new countries must do this, but St. Maarten was not paying its debts. To prevent the creditors from having to remain with outstanding bills too long, the committee decided to pay as an advance on what St. Maarten is to get," said Metry.

In the meantime this has stopped to prevent more being paid out than St. Maarten actually gets in the end.

Metry said there were more issues on which the Government of St. Maarten was not taking action. Land of the Netherlands Antilles was transferred to the new entities, but St. Maarten did not register its land at the mortgage office.

Also regarding former Central Government-owned companies, the two countries must indicate their preference. "Take UTS: does St. Maarten want to sell or keep its shares? We are hearing nothing about this."

Metry laments Tuitt's statements. "He should have known better as a former member of the Antillean Parliament and accountant. St. Maarten has a representative on the committee; if they want information that's where they need to go."

WILLEMSTAD--If St. Maarten feels something not going right with the division of assets and liabilities of the dismantled Netherlands Antilles, it should check with its representative on the settlement committee.

That's what committee chairman Faroe Metry said in response to the statement by Finance Minister Roland Tuitt in Parliament that "Curaçao is plundering" the liquidity remaining from the – no longer existent – Antillean constellation.

Metry said he had no idea what Tuitt was talking about, but St. Maarten has a member [Jean James-Ed.] on the committee. "I don't know if there is any plundering, but the settlement committee is doing its work according to what is determined by law."

According to him, government accountants SOAB and KPMG are still working on the final balance. As an advance, the committee has been paying creditors who reported after the new constitutional ties within the Dutch Kingdom took effect on 10-10-10.

"The law says that the governments of the two new countries must do this, but St. Maarten was not paying its debts. To prevent the creditors from having to remain with outstanding bills too long, the committee decided to pay as an advance on what St. Maarten is to get," said Metry.

In the meantime this has stopped to prevent more being paid out than St. Maarten actually gets in the end.

Metry said there were more issues on which the Government of St. Maarten was not taking action. Land of the Netherlands Antilles was transferred to the new entities, but St. Maarten did not register its land at the mortgage office.

Also regarding former Central Government-owned companies, the two countries must indicate their preference. "Take UTS: does St. Maarten want to sell or keep its shares? We are hearing nothing about this."

Metry laments Tuitt's statements. "He should have known better as a former member of the Antillean Parliament and accountant. St. Maarten has a representative on the committee; if they want information that's where they need to go."